What Types of Verbs Exist in The English Language?

There are several different types of verbs that exist in the English language, and each type serves a specific purpose. In this article, we will explore the types of verbs that exist in this language.
Mohammed Wasim Akram
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Last Updated: December 29, 2022
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Verbs are an essential part of the English language, and they play a vital role in conveying meaning and expressing actions, states of being, and other concepts.

Verbs can be categorized in several different ways and understanding the different types of verbs and how they are used can help improve your communication skills and enable you to use the English language more effectively.

There are several different types of verbs that exist in the English language, and each type serves a specific purpose. Some of the main types of verbs are:

Action Verbs

Action verbs describe an action that is being taken. They can be used to express physical actions, mental actions, or states of being.

Examples of action verbs include "run," "jump," "think," "be," and "have."

For example:

  • "She runs every day." (action verb: "runs")
  • "He jumps higher than anyone else." (action verb: "jumps")
  • "I think about you all the time." (action verb: "think")
  • "We are happy." (action verb: "are")
  • "They have a lot of books." (action verb: "have")

Linking Verbs

Linking verbs connect the subject of a sentence to a subject complement. They can be used to express a state of being or a condition.

Examples of linking verbs include "be," "seem," "become," "appear," and "remain."

For example:

  • "She is tired." (linking verb: "is")
  • "He seems happy." (linking verb: "seems")
  • "The sky became cloudy." (linking verb: "became")
  • "She appears worried." (linking verb: "appears")
  • "The situation remains unchanged." (linking verb: "remains")

Auxiliary Verbs

Auxiliary verbs, also known as helping verbs, are used in conjunction with main verbs to form verb phrases. They are used to indicate tense, mood, or voice, and they often convey information about the subject of the sentence.

Examples of auxiliary verbs include "be," "have," "do," "will," and "would."

For example:

  • "She is running." (auxiliary verb: "is")
  • "He has eaten." (auxiliary verb: "has")
  • "I do not understand." (auxiliary verb: "do")
  • "We will go to the park." (auxiliary verb: "will")

Modal Verbs

Modal verbs, also known as models, are used to indicate the possibility, necessity, or permission. They can be used to express a variety of concepts, including ability, possibility, probability, necessity, obligation, and permission.

Examples of modal verbs include "can," "could," "may," "might," "must," "shall," "should," "will," and "would."

For example:

  • "She can swim." (modal verb: "can")
  • "He could have gone, but he decided to stay." (modal verb: "could")
  • "You may leave now." (modal verb: "may")
  • "It might rain later." (modal verb: "might")
  • "We must finish this project by tomorrow." (modal verb: "must")

Transitive Verbs

Transitive verbs are verbs that require an object to complete their meaning. For example, in the sentence "She gave the book to her friend," the verb "gave" is transitive because it requires the object "the book" to complete its meaning.

Examples of transitive verbs include "eat," "throw," "read," "give," and "send."

For example:

  • "She ate the apple." (transitive verb: "ate")
  • "He threw the ball." (transitive verb: "threw")
  • "I read the book." (transitive verb: "read")
  • "We gave the present to our friend." (transitive verb: "gave")
  • "They sent the package to the address." (transitive verb: "sent")

Intransitive Verbs

Intransitive verbs do not require an object to complete their meaning. For example, in the sentence "She laughed," the verb "laughed" is intransitive because it does not require an object to complete its meaning.

Examples of intransitive verbs include "sleep," "arrive," "die," "exist," and "remain."

For example:

  • "She sleeps eight hours a night." (intransitive verb: "sleeps")
  • "He arrived late to the party." (intransitive verb: "arrived")
  • "The plant died because it didn't get enough water." (intransitive verb: "died")
  • "The sun exists in the sky." (intransitive verb: "exists")
  • "The situation remains unchanged." (intransitive verb: "remains")

Regular Verbs

Regular verbs are verbs that follow a regular pattern when they are conjugated, meaning that they add -ed to form the past tense and -ed or -en to form the past participle. Examples of regular verbs include "walk," "talk," and "play."

  1. Regular verbs: Regular verbs are verbs that follow the regular verb conjugation pattern in the past tense and past participle.

Examples of regular verbs include "walk," "talk," "play," "work," and "study."

For example:

  • "She walked to the store." (regular verb: "walked")
  • "He talked on the phone." (regular verb: "talked")
  • "I played soccer." (regular verb: "played")
  • "We worked hard." (regular verb: "worked")
  • "They studied every day." (regular verb: "studied")

Irregular Verbs

Irregular verbs are verbs that do not follow a regular pattern when they are conjugated. They often have irregular past tense and past participle forms. Examples of irregular verbs include "go," "be," and "have."

Examples of irregular verbs include "go," "see," "eat," "be," and "have."

For example:

  • "She went to the store." (irregular verb: "went")
  • "He saw the movie." (irregular verb: "saw")
  • "I ate the apple." (irregular verb: "ate")
  • "We were happy." (irregular verb: "were")
  • "They have a lot of books." (irregular verb: "have")

Reflexive Verbs

Reflexive verbs are verbs that are followed by a reflexive pronoun, such as "myself," "yourself," or "themselves." Reflexive verbs are used when the subject of the verb is also the object of the verb. For example, in the sentence "She washed herself," the verb "washed" is reflexive because the subject "she" is also the object of the verb.

Examples of reflexive verbs include "wash," "dress," "introduce," "enjoy," and "hurt."

For example:

  • "She washed herself." (reflexive verb: "washed")
  • "He dressed himself." (reflexive verb: "dressed")
  • "I introduced myself." (reflexive verb: "introduced")
  • "We enjoyed ourselves." (reflexive verb: "enjoyed")
  • "They hurt themselves." (reflexive verb: "hurt")

Reciprocal Verbs

Reciprocal verbs are verbs that describe actions that are mutually done by two or more people. These verbs are often followed by a reciprocal pronoun, such as "each other" or "one another." For example, in the sentence "The siblings love each other," the verb "love" is reciprocal because it describes an action that is mutually done by the siblings.

Examples of reciprocal verbs include "love," "hate," "like," "dislike," and "admire."

For example:

  • "They love each other." (reciprocal verb: "love")
  • "She hates him." (reciprocal verb: "hates")
  • "We like each other." (reciprocal verb: "like")
  • "They dislike each other." (reciprocal verb: "dislike")
  • "I admire him." (reciprocal verb: "admire")
  • "They respect each other." (reciprocal verb: "respect")

Conclusion

Verbs are a vital part of the English language, and they play a crucial role in conveying meaning and expressing actions, states of being, and other concepts.

There are several different types of verbs that exist in English, including action verbs, linking verbs, modal verbs, and auxiliary verbs.

Each type of verb serves a specific purpose and can be used in a variety of ways to express different meanings and convey different kinds of information.

Understanding the different types of verbs and how they are used can help improve your communication skills and enable you to use the English language more effectively.

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Article Author
Mohammed Wasim Akram
Hello myself Wasim, I’m from the city of Mother Teresa Calcutta (currently Kolkata), which exists in India, a country of unity in diversity.I belong to the sales and marketing field with 10+ years of experience. In December of 2017, I switched my career from a 9 to 5 traditional job to the digital entrepreneurship.Currently, I am a Google and HubSpot certified Digital Marketer, a WordPress Specialist, Web Designer & Strategist and the founder of SyncWin.
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